Saturday, April 19, 2014
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Cryosurgery - Icy Cold Handiwork

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Sleuth the Reporter Dog recently had a great experience at his veterinarian.  Sleuth had a small wart over his right eye and his veterinarian was able to remove it without anesthesia and right there in the exam room.  Naturally, Sleuth now wants everyone to know about Cryosurgery!

1)    Cryosurgery is a technique gaining popularity among human doctors and veterinarians for removing small, unsightly growths from the skin.  Using extremely cold liquid nitrogen, nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide, the growths are literally frozen away!

2)    Historically, any mass or growth removal from the skin required anesthetics as our pets don’t understand the need to remain still in surgery.

3)    Cryosurgery is not a new technology, but modern devices are making it easier for veterinarians to remove these warts, skin tags and even cancerous growths.

4)    Hand held, portable tools now enable our animal’s doctor to very precisely place the high pressure, extremely cold gas directly onto the lesions.  This spares the surrounding tissue and even allows this device to be used in delicate areas, like the mouth or eyelids.

5)    Essentially, cryosurgery freezes the growth, then we allow it to thaw and then it is frozen again.  This “freeze-thaw-freeze” cycle creates ice crystals within the mass, destroying it from the inside.

6)    The cold sensation also creates numbing.  This means that the procedure is very often bloodless and more importantly, painless.

7)    Without the need for sterile preparation, anesthetics and a more efficient use of our doctor’s time, cryosurgery is often a more economical option for many pet owners.

8)    The portable nature of the device means that we can use this type of surgery right in the exam room or even in your home or at your farm!

9)    Although this technique is extremely helpful, there are some masses and growths that will need traditional surgery.

10)    Trust a site like MyVNN.com to provide you with accurate and unbiased pet health information.